sleep

Preventing Seasonal Affective Disorder

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression, often known as ‘Winter Depression’, that comes and goes in a seasonal pattern. The symptoms often begin in autumn and last throughout the darker months, but they are more apparent and tend to be more severe during the winter. Some sufferers may feel the effects right up until the weather improves and days become lighter in the spring. The symptoms can

tired-to-sleeping

When people don’t get enough sleep, certain brain cells literally slow down. A study that recorded directly from neurons in the brains of 12 people found that sleep deprivation causes the bursts of electrical activity that brain cells use to communicate to become slower and weaker, a team reports online Monday in Nature Medicine. The finding could help explain why a lack of sleep impairs a range of mental functions,

Infographic : 5 Scientifically Backed Tips to Help You Get to Sleep

We all know that a good sleep is very important for our health.  With a great deal of scientific research available that says adults need eight hours sleep per night.  Ignoring this research can have negative consequences for both boy and mind. Armed with the knowledge that good sleep is vital for a healthy lifestyle, we can take steps to ensure we’re approaching sleep in the best possible way in

Sleepless Nights Could Pose Heart Risk Dangers

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Getting less than six hours of sleep a night may double the odds of dying from heart disease or stroke for people who already have risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, new research suggests. Known as metabolic syndrome, this cluster of risk factors can include high blood pressure, high levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, high blood sugar, obesity, high levels of blood

Your Sleep Habits Could Be Why You're Packing on Pounds

People who don’t get the recommended amount of sleep each night are more likely to be overweight and have larger waistlines, according to a new study published in PLOS ONE. But what the study didn’t find was the real surprise: The results showed no relationship between poor sleep and a less healthy diet. In other words, skimping on shuteye may fuel weight gain, even if it’s not fueling a penchant